Yale Postdoctoral Trainees

NPA Seminar: Prakhar Garg, Stony Brook University, “Gaseous detectors for upcoming and future experiments”

Gaseous detectors are one of the most versatile concepts used in a wide range of physics experiments.
In this seminar, I would discuss some of their flavours in nuclear and high energy physics experiments. Particular emphasis will be on Time Projection Chamber for sPHENIX experiment, GEM Trackers for MOLLER experiment, Cylindrical \mu-RWELL for PIONEER Experiment and Generic ongoing R&D plans of GridPix detector for EIC. I would try to incorporate mostly the key features of these detector concepts and what makes them interesting to us.
Host: Helen Caines

Dissertation Defense: London Cooper-Troendle, Yale University, "First Measurement of Inclusive Muon Neutrino Charged Current Triple Differential Cross Section on Argon"

The field of accelerator neutrino experiments is entering an era of precision oscillation measurements where the remaining unknown neutrino measurements will be determined. The upcoming DUNE and Hyper-K experiments aim to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and degree of Charge-Parity (CP) violation in the neutrino sector, providing potential insight on the matter-antimatter imbalance observed in the universe. However, these experiments require highly accurate measurements, and neutrino cross section modeling uncertainties may limit their capabilities.

Dissertation Defense: Kaicheng Li, Yale University, "Searching for the Electron Neutrino Anomaly with the MicroBooNE Experiment Using Wire-Cell Reconstruction"

The Micro Booster Neutrino Experiment (MicroBooNE) is a leading large-scale Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) experiment, designed for precision neutrino physics. The main scientific objectives of MicroBooNE include the investigation of the Low Energy Excess (LEE) observed by the MiniBooNE Experiment between 2002-2019 in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at Fermilab, the measurements of neutrino-argon interactions, and the research and development of LArTPC technology. This thesis focuses on understanding the MiniBooNE LEE through charged-current electron neutrino interactions.

Introduction to Data Analysis with Python Workshop

Python is general purpose, interpreted programming language with a rich set of scientific and mathematic modules. As an interpreted language, it trades computational speed for iterative agility. It lends itself particularly well to the task of preparing raw data and performing exploratory analysis. This workshop will introduce participants to data analysis using Jupiter and Python, Numpy, and Pandas. Prior experience with Python is useful but not essential.
Led by Vincent Balbarin, Research Computing Specialist, Wright Lab & YCRC

WIDG Seminar: Will Tyndall, Yale, “Nearfield to Farfield Methods for Drone Beam Mapping”

Extracting cosmological 21 cm emission from the radio foregrounds which dominate requires precision calibration, including sub-percent measurements of the complex instrument beam. 21 cm cosmology experiments are typically driven to be compact transit interferometers with poor point-source sensitivity, and have found it difficult to constrain the beam shape to this precision with sky data alone. A technique that has been developed and demonstrated by multiple groups to address this is to transmit a calibrated RF signal from a drone into the telescope to measure the beam pattern.

WIDG Seminar: Evan Craft, Yale, “Beautiful and Charming Energy Correlators”

Understanding the detailed structure of energy flow within jets, a field known as jet substructure, plays a central role in searches for new physics, and precision studies of QCD. In this talk, I will discuss how reformulating jet susbtructure in terms of correlations of energy flow can be used to provide new insights into hadronization and intrinsic mass effects before confinement. In particular, I will show how energy correlators manifest the long-sought-after “dead-cone” effect of fundamental QCD.

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