General Public

Dissertation Defense: Tong Liu, Yale University, "Inclusive Hadron Yield Analysis in Small and Mid-sized Collision Systems at sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV at STAR"

At extremely high temperature and energy density, the quarks and gluons form a novel state of matter called the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). The QGP has been widely studied via relativistic heavy ion collisions in large collision systems like Au+Au and Pb+Pb. However, whether the QGP exists in small systems like p+Au, and the dependence of QGP production on the collision system size are still open questions. One way to study the QGP properties is by using proxies of high energy partons, which are created in the initial stages of the collisions, and fragment into hadrons in the final state.

Connecting Past to Present: Building a Cultural Heritage Center in Lagos, Nigeria

Join us for the launch of the Yale IPCH Public Talks: a series dedicated to exploring global perspectives and critical developments that impact cultural heritage preservation. In this inaugural event, this distinguished expert panel will contextualize the highly anticipated John Randle Centre for Yoruba History and Culture within the economic, social, and cultural landscape of Lagos, the most populous city on the African continent.

The Age of Living Machines: How Biology Will Build the Next Technology Revolution

With an anticipated world population of over 9.5 billion by 2050, we face an unprecedented challenge to sustainably provide sufficient food, water, energy and healthcare. Convergence, the merging of previously distinct disciplines, has emerged as a powerful model with untold potential to drive a new cycle of innovation-based economic growth. Bringing together insights and discoveries from the life, engineering, computation and physical sciences holds the promise of accelerating discovery and the development of new technologies to meet the 21st century’s needs.

What is a 'Cause,' and Why Does it Happen Before the Effect?

The physics of the time orientation of causation is more subtle than what it looks like superficially. For a long while it was reduced to a mere linguistic issue (a “cause” is just the term of a correlation that happens earlier, Hume). As emphasized by Russell, there is no time orientation in fundamental physics. But causation was later better understood as an essential notion in the context of an agent having choices, which after all is our own common context. This traces the time orientation of causation to the time orientation of agency.

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